If you want to explore our local mountains…

This week a couple of hundred friends and colleagues of the International Policy Goverance Association (#IPGA2015) will be travelling here to meet in Vancouver. This post is for you if you find yourself looking at the great mountain range that rises from the city’s North Shore — and are pining to experience those hills. For 25 years, I’ve been hiking and backcountry skiing that endless high country, so be sure to ask me about the great places and routes. What follows is a sampler to whet your appetite.

You will need a car and a map (Google Earth on your phone will do). Here are some destinations that don’t require a 4×4.

The easiest way to get high is to go up on a wire. Check out these links: Grouse Mountain in nearby North Vancouver, SeaToSky Gondola in Howe Sound (the link includes a shuttle from Canada Place but you can drive up there yourself), and Whistler’s Ski Resort Summer Program.

Everything that follows is free.

Looking north from the downtown peninsula, the mile-high mountain visible at the end of all the streets facing NE is Mount Seymour (1450m/4766ft). The road climbs the south ridge of the mountain to a ski area.

Mount Seymour from 547 West Cordova Street in Vancouver

Mt. Seymour from West Cordova Street in downtown Vancouver
click for full-size image

Just before the parking lot, at 3240ft, is a pullout with an awesome view of Vancouver. From the north end of the parking lot there is a hikers’ trail to the summit of the mountain. This is where I must make the usual guidebook warning and disclaimer. In spite of the easy road access, the hike is high-altitude wilderness mountain travel. It will be colder up there than in the city. The trail is rugged and includes some scrambling. You’ll need to be fit, and prepared for sudden changes of weather and possible injury. Carry food, water and extra clothing. Know about the 10-essentials for your pack (don’t even think about making a fire). The trail follows a broad ridge, and the only way down is back along the trail. Warnings aside, the location and views are stunning and mountain hikers will have a good time. The round-trip is 5.5 miles and the elevation gain is 1475ft (with lots of down-and-up).

The Mouth of the fjord called Howe Sound

The mouth of the fjord called Howe Sound; Bowen Island; in the distance Georgia Strait and Vancouver Island. Bowyer Island is in the foreground. The point on the right is the Sunshine Coast and the town of Gibsons. Below is the Sea-To-Sky highway and a glimpse of West Vancouver on the left. This is from The Balcony on St. Marks Summit

If I want to show visitors some high altitude old-growth forest, I take them to Cypress Bowl Provincial Park. The access road departs from the Upper Level Highway in West Vancouver and climbs Hollyburn Mountain. At the two main switchbacks there are excellent lookouts with outstanding views over Burrard Inlet, all of Vancouver, Mount Baker, and on a clear day you might see Mount Rainier in the USA. The road ends in a ski area called Cypress Mountain (no mountain with that name here). The three mountains that surround this high altitude bowl are Black, Strachan (pronounced Strawn), and Hollyburn. For a very easy walk, drive to the end of the road and park by the lodge. There are well maintained, fairly level trails that head west toward Yew Lake. For a more ambitious day, this is the start of the trail to St. Marks Summit << The link is my illustrated account of that hike — highly recommended.

If you love mountain travel, and you are looking for more adventure, contact me directly. Once I learn something about your capabilities I’ll have lots more recommendations. I might even tell you about the trails I mapped up Mount Gardner on Bowen Island.

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